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Created by Lucas Kern

Learn German Easily

Created by Lucas Kern

German Accusative Case „einen“

Basic Lesson No 19

Nominative and Accusative

The German cases Nominative and Accusative – Part 2

Please read the page from top to bottom carefully.

Do you remember what you learned in lesson No 2 about the indefinite articles ein and eine?

And have you been repeating lesson No 14 (first contact with nominative and accusative)?

I think it is a good idea to repeat basic lesson No 2: Indefinite Articles and basic lesson No 14: Accusative Case „den“ before you do this lesson. If you repeat both, lesson 19 will be much easier.

I know lesson No 14 was a little complicated. So I thought I take lesson 14 as a basis for this lesson and change it only a little bit. This way, you will have another repetition and this lesson will be more familiar.

I’ll try to make it as easy as possible but the cases can be a little tricky. That’s why I recommend practicing a lot with my TPRS audio stories. If you do, you will develop a natural feeling for the cases and you don’t have to learn any rules by heart!

Remember:

Nominative Case: 
The nominative case is usually used for a person or thing which is doing the action. This noun which is doing the action is the subject. There is always only one subject in a sentence therefore only one nominative case.

Accusative Case: 
The accusative case is usually used for a person or thing that is directly affected by the action. These nouns are called direct objects.

Do you remember the indefinite articles ein, eine? If you are not sure go back to lesson 2.

Ein Mann liest.

Eine Frau isst.

Ein Mädchen schreibt.

In all three sentences above we have only the nominative case because in each sentence we have a person (noun) who is doing some action (reading, eating, writing).

To make it a little more interesting let’s place two nouns in some sentences, one in the nominative and the other one in the accusative case.

Let's work our way through

Scenario 1

Nominative / Accusative – Scenario 1

Let’s have a look at a sentence with the verb suchen (to look for, to search):

ein Mädchen (neuter) 
ein Kind (neuter)

>> Ein Mädchen sucht ein Kind.

Did you notice that there are two nouns in the sentence?

One of the two nouns is playing the leading part and is doing the action.

A girl (ein Mädchen) is playing the leading part, because a girl is doing something. A child (ein Kind) is not playing the leading part but it is directly involved.

1st noun = Mädchen (leading part) = doing the action = nominative case

2nd noun = Kind = not doing the action but directly involved = accusative case

Don’t forget to check out all my other Lessons

Let's work our way through

Scenario 2

Nominative / Accusative – Scenario 2

Now we change the sentence a little:

Ein Mädchen (neuter)
Eine Frau (feminine)

>> Ein Mädchen sucht eine Frau.

1st noun = Mädchen (leading part) = doing the action = nominative case

2nd noun = Frau = not doing the action but directly involved = accusative case

So far, so good 🙂

Let's work our way through

Scenario 3

Nominative / Accusative – Scenario 3

Ein Mädchen (neuter)
Ein Mann (masculine)

>> Ein Mädchen sucht einen Mann.

Mädchen = neuter => das and therefore the indefinite article ein.
Mann = masculine => der and therefore also the indefinite article ein.

Mmmm – but why we use einen in this sentence?

Let’s see:

1st noun = Mädchen (leading part) = doing the action = nominative case

2nd noun = Mann = not doing the action but directly involved = accusative case

It is because the indefinite article ein when we use it for a masculine noun changes to einen in the accusative case!

It is similar to the masculine article: der in lesson No 14, it changed to den. Now the masculine indefinite article: ein changed to einen in the accusative case.

More Examples

Try to recognize the pattern

Nominative / Accusative – More Examples

For now it is enough when you notice that we use einen when the noun does not play the leading part and it is masculine. In all these example sentences the first noun is in the nominative case and the second noun is in the accusative case.

Note that the indefinite articles eine and ein (when used for a feminine or neuter noun) stay the same in the accusative case and that the definite article ein (when used for a masculine noun) changes to einen in the accusative case.

Let’s have a look at some sentences with the verb hauen (to beat, hit somebody):

Ein Mann haut einen Mann.
Ein Mann haut eine Frau.
Ein Mann haut ein Kind.

Eine Frau haut einen Mann.
Eine Frau haut eine Frau.
Eine Frau haut ein Kind.

Ein Kind haut einen Mann.
Ein Kind haut eine Frau.
Ein Kind haut ein Kind.

Plural Accusative:

Remember: If we have a plural noun we don’t use the indefinite article at all: 

Ein Mann haut Männer.
Eine Frau haut Männer.
Ein Kind haut Frauen.

Basic German Lesson 1 and 2

Don’t forget to check out all my other Lessons

Interrogatives (question words)

Wen? Wer?

Wen? Wer? – Identify the German Cases

If there are people involved then we need the question word: wen to identify the noun (person) that is in the accusative.

With the question word: wer we can identify the noun (person) that is in the nominative.

For example:

Eine Frau haut einen Mann.

Frage:
Wer haut (einen Mann)?

Antwort:
Eine Frau
Eine Frau haut einen Mann.

Frage:
Wen haut die Frau?

Antwort:
einen Mann
Eine Frau haut einen Mann.

How To Learn With Part A

  1. Read and listen a few times.
  2. Repeat after the speaker.
  3. Make sure that you imitate the pronunciation of the speaker.
  4. After a few repetitions go on to part B (farther below).

Click the play button

      Lesson 19A

Now it is your part:

Martin sucht ein Kind.
Martin is looking for a child.

Monika sucht eine Frau.
Monika is looking for a woman.

Peter sucht einen Mann.
Peter is looking for a man.

Don’t forget to check out all my other Lessons

German Accusative Case

Basic Lesson No 19B

Basic German Lesson 1 and 2

How To Learn With Part B

Question and Answer Part

This technique is very effective to save new information (the words, pronunciation, structure etc.) in your brain. Don't be afraid of part B. I use the same words as in part A.

  1. Read and listen a few times to the question and answers.
  2. Answer the questions in the pauses (you may look also at the answers).
  3. After a few times don't look at the answers anymore.
  4. Make sure that you imitate the pronunciation of the speaker.
  5. Repeat the lesson until you can answer the questions easily.
  6. Sign up to my e-mail course and learn how to use the storytelling method (TPRS method) in order to learn to speak German fluently.
How to learn with part B

Question and Answer Part

This technique is very effective to save new information (the words, pronunciation, structure etc.) in your brain. Don't be afraid of part B. I use the same words as in part A.

  1. Read and listen a few times to the question and answers.
  2. Answer the questions in the pauses (you may look also at the answers).
  3. After a few times don't look at the answers anymore.
  4. Make sure that you imitate the pronunciation of the speaker.
  5. Repeat the lesson until you can answer the questions easily.
  6. Sign up to my e-mail course and learn how to use the storytelling method (TPRS method) in order to learn to speak German fluently.

Click the play button

      Lesson 19B

Fragen und Antworten

1) Martin sucht ein Kind.

Frage:
Wer sucht ein Kind?

Kurze Antwort:
Martin

Lange Antwort:
Martin sucht ein Kind.

Wen sucht Martin?
ein Kind
Martin sucht ein Kind.

2) Monika sucht eine Frau. 

Wer sucht eine Frau?
Monika
Monika
sucht eine Frau.

Wen sucht Monika?
eine Frau
Monika sucht eine Frau.

3) Peter sucht einen Mann.

Wer sucht einen Mann?
Peter
Peter sucht einen Mann.

Wen sucht Peter?
einen Mann
Peter sucht einen Mann.

Hast du bemerkt, wann wir „wer?“ und wann wir „wen?“ benutzen? Hier ist ein Tipp: Es hat etwas zu tun mit: Wer spielt die Hauptrolle?

Did you notice when we use „wer?“ and when we use „wen?“ Here’s a hint: It has something to do with: Who plays the leading part?

Almost finished 🙂

It is very important that you get familiar with the verb structure and that’s why I want to add this little bonus.

The Verb: „suchen“

Amost finished 🙂

It is very important that you get familiar with the verb structure and that’s why I want to add this little bonus.

Click the play button

      Lesson 19C

The verb „suchen“ = to look for, search (regular verb)

Singular:

Ich suche
Du suchst
Er sucht
Sie sucht
Es sucht

Plural:

Wir suchen
Ihr sucht
Sie suchen

Don’t forget to check out all my other Lessons

Click the play button

      Motivation

Never give up!

Wenn du glaubst, dass dieses kompliziert ist, mach dir keine Sorgen! Es ist nur eine Frage des Übens. Und ich werde dieses Thema in späteren Lektionen wiederholen.

1. Gebe (gib) niemals auf!

2. Wiederhole diese Lektion viele Male.

If you think this is complicated, don’t worry! It’s just a matter of practice. And I will repeat this matter in further lessons.

1) Never give up!

2) Repeat this lesson many times!

Keep it up – you can do it!

Lucas - Learn German Easily

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Created by Lucas Kern